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Academic Archives
Managing the Next Generation of College and University Archives, Records, and Special Collections
Aaron D. Purcell
American Library Association, 2012

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Academic Librarian Burnout
Causes and Responses
Christina Holm
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2022
Librarianship has been conceptualized as a vocation or calling—rather than a profession—since the 1800s. Within this historical context, librarians are encouraged to think of ourselves as possessing a natural disposition to showing perpetual engagement, enthusiasm, and self-regulation in pursuit of our shared vocation. These assumptions about the profession can sometimes shield us from introspective criticism, but they can also prevent us from recognizing and managing the systemic occupational issues that afflict us.
 
Academic Librarian Burnout can help librarians develop the agency to challenge the assumptions and practices that have led to so much professional burnout. In five thorough parts, it offers ways to discuss burnout in our work environments, studies burnout’s nature and causes, and provides preventative intervention and mitigation strategies:
  • Reframing Burnout
  • Conditions that Promote Burnout
  • Lived Experiences
  • Individual Responses to Burnout
  • Organizational Responses to Burnout
Chapters explore the relationship of burnout in academic libraries and illness, intersectionality, workload, managerial approaches, and more, while offering real-life stories and ways for both individuals and organizations to address the symptoms and causes of burnout. The emotional, physical, and mental investment we require of librarianship—to go above and beyond to serve the ever-evolving needs of our patrons while perennially justifying our existence to library stakeholders—can come at the expense of our well-being. Academic Librarian Burnout addresses unsustainable work environments and preserves and celebrates the unique contributions of librarians.
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Academic Librarian Faculty Status
CLIPP #47
Edgar Bailey
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2022
The College Library Information on Policy and Practice (CLIPP) publishing program, under the auspices of the College Libraries Section of the Association of College and Research Libraries, provides college and small university libraries analysis and examples of library practices and procedures.

Academic Librarian Faculty Status: CLIPP #47 contains a thorough literature review and bibliography, analysis and discussion of survey results, and sample criteria, policies, and guidelines for appointment, promotion, and tenure for librarians with and without faculty status.

No other group of employees in higher education has occupied quite the same ambivalent status on campus as librarians. The debate over granting librarians the same rights and responsibilities as faculty has generated a substantial body of literature over the years. Most of this research has tended to focus on either a mix of institutional sizes or on large universities, with a surprising dearth of studies of smaller institutions. The results of the survey reported in CLIPP #47 fills this gap, as well as offering practical information and sample tenure and promotion documents and policies.
 
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Academic Librarianship
G. Edward Evans
American Library Association, 2018

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Academic Librarianship
Camila Alire
American Library Association, 2010

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Academic Libraries and the Academy (2 VOLUME SET)
Strategies and Approaches to Demonstrate Your Value, Impact, and Return on Investment
Marwin Britto
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2018

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Academic Libraries And The Academy
Vol 1
Marwin Britto
American Library Association, 2018

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Academic Libraries And The Academy Vol 2
Marwin Britto
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2018

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Academic Libraries for Commuter Students
Research-Based Strategies
Mariana Regalado
American Library Association, 2018

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The Academic Library Administrator's Field Guide
Bryce Nelson
American Library Association, 2022

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The Academic Library Administrator's Field Guide
Bryce Nelson
American Library Association, 2014

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Academic Library Impact
Improving Practice And
Lynn Silipigni Connaway
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2017

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Academic Library Job Descriptions
CLIPP #46
Kathleen Baril
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2021

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Academic Library Management
Case Studies
Tammy Nickelson Dearie
American Library Association, 2017

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Academic Library Mentoring
Fostering Growth and Renewal: Three Volume Set
Leila June Rod-Welch
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2021
Mentoring in academic libraries implies a belief in the future of library employees, systems, the profession, and the principles that libraries uphold. It signifies a commitment to the broader institution and to higher education’s values of exploration, discovery, critical examination, and knowledge generation.
 
Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal presents a cross-section of mentoring thought and practice in college and university libraries, including mentoring definitions, practice fundamentals, models, program development, surveys, and analysis. Across three volumes, it explores library mentoring programs and the lived experiences of library faculty, librarians, library staff members, graduate library and information science students, and library student employees.
 
Volume 1, Fundamentals and Controversies, details effective mentoring skills and behaviors, mentoring models, dysfunctional mentoring relationships, conflicts of interest in mentoring, and, through a feminist lens, power differentials in mentoring. Chapters on diversity, equity, and inclusion call for library personnel to understand the exclusion some experience in the profession and to implement more inclusive mentoring practices.
 
Mentoring of Library Faculty and Librarians, Volume 2, explores mentorship skills, models, purposes and issues, and program development. Mentoring purposes include support for the pursuit of tenure and promotion, other career goals, and psychosocial concerns. Issues incorporate understanding and addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion in mentoring. Chapter methodologies include surveys, program assessments, analysis of practices against standards, case studies of mentor and mentee lived experiences, and case studies of libraries and affiliated entities.
 
In Volume 3, Mentoring of Students and Staff, we hear the voices of library science students and library student employees as they describe their library school and library employment mentoring experiences. Also presented are mentoring programs for recruiting individuals to the profession, practices supporting all library employees regardless of formal employee classification, and methods for enhancing the skills of consortial members. The volume ends with a look to the future of mentoring and organizational development and with a tool any library employee at any career stage can use in forming their own mentoring constellation.
 
Intentional, effective, committed mentorships can help mentees understand their roles and develop their identities as librarians, library workers, or library science students. Mentorships also help mentees understand and meet performance standards, broaden their skills, shift to new specializations, and discern options for contributing to the larger institution and the profession. Through mentoring, mentors may be invigorated by contributing to the growth of mentees and by encountering ideas and approaches different from their own. Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal addresses the many dimensions of contemporary academic library mentoring and how best to engage in inclusive, effective mentoring.
 
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Academic Library Mentoring
Fostering Growth and Renewal: Volume 1: Fundamentals and Controversies
Leila June Rod-Welch
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2021
Mentoring in academic libraries implies a belief in the future of library employees, systems, the profession, and the principles that libraries uphold. It signifies a commitment to the broader institution and to higher education’s values of exploration, discovery, critical examination, and knowledge generation.
 
Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal presents a cross-section of mentoring thought and practice in college and university libraries, including mentoring definitions, practice fundamentals, models, program development, surveys, and analysis. Across three volumes, it explores library mentoring programs and the lived experiences of library faculty, librarians, library staff members, graduate library and information science students, and library student employees.
 
Volume 1, Fundamentals and Controversies, details effective mentoring skills and behaviors, mentoring models, dysfunctional mentoring relationships, conflicts of interest in mentoring, and, through a feminist lens, power differentials in mentoring. Chapters on diversity, equity, and inclusion call for library personnel to understand the exclusion some experience in the profession and to implement more inclusive mentoring practices.
 
Mentoring of Library Faculty and Librarians, Volume 2, explores mentorship skills, models, purposes and issues, and program development. Mentoring purposes include support for the pursuit of tenure and promotion, other career goals, and psychosocial concerns. Issues incorporate understanding and addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion in mentoring. Chapter methodologies include surveys, program assessments, analysis of practices against standards, case studies of mentor and mentee lived experiences, and case studies of libraries and affiliated entities.
 
In Volume 3, Mentoring of Students and Staff, we hear the voices of library science students and library student employees as they describe their library school and library employment mentoring experiences. Also presented are mentoring programs for recruiting individuals to the profession, practices supporting all library employees regardless of formal employee classification, and methods for enhancing the skills of consortial members. The volume ends with a look to the future of mentoring and organizational development and with a tool any library employee at any career stage can use in forming their own mentoring constellation.
 
Intentional, effective, committed mentorships can help mentees understand their roles and develop their identities as librarians, library workers, or library science students. Mentorships also help mentees understand and meet performance standards, broaden their skills, shift to new specializations, and discern options for contributing to the larger institution and the profession. Through mentoring, mentors may be invigorated by contributing to the growth of mentees and by encountering ideas and approaches different from their own. Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal addresses the many dimensions of contemporary academic library mentoring and how best to engage in inclusive, effective mentoring.
[more]

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Academic Library Mentoring
Fostering Growth and Renewal: Volume 2: Mentoring of Library Faculty and Librarians
Leila June Rod-Welch
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2021
Mentoring in academic libraries implies a belief in the future of library employees, systems, the profession, and the principles that libraries uphold. It signifies a commitment to the broader institution and to higher education’s values of exploration, discovery, critical examination, and knowledge generation.
 
Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal presents a cross-section of mentoring thought and practice in college and university libraries, including mentoring definitions, practice fundamentals, models, program development, surveys, and analysis. Across three volumes, it explores library mentoring programs and the lived experiences of library faculty, librarians, library staff members, graduate library and information science students, and library student employees.
 
Volume 1, Fundamentals and Controversies, details effective mentoring skills and behaviors, mentoring models, dysfunctional mentoring relationships, conflicts of interest in mentoring, and, through a feminist lens, power differentials in mentoring. Chapters on diversity, equity, and inclusion call for library personnel to understand the exclusion some experience in the profession and to implement more inclusive mentoring practices.
 
Mentoring of Library Faculty and Librarians, Volume 2, explores mentorship skills, models, purposes and issues, and program development. Mentoring purposes include support for the pursuit of tenure and promotion, other career goals, and psychosocial concerns. Issues incorporate understanding and addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion in mentoring. Chapter methodologies include surveys, program assessments, analysis of practices against standards, case studies of mentor and mentee lived experiences, and case studies of libraries and affiliated entities.
 
In Volume 3, Mentoring of Students and Staff, we hear the voices of library science students and library student employees as they describe their library school and library employment mentoring experiences. Also presented are mentoring programs for recruiting individuals to the profession, practices supporting all library employees regardless of formal employee classification, and methods for enhancing the skills of consortial members. The volume ends with a look to the future of mentoring and organizational development and with a tool any library employee at any career stage can use in forming their own mentoring constellation.
 
Intentional, effective, committed mentorships can help mentees understand their roles and develop their identities as librarians, library workers, or library science students. Mentorships also help mentees understand and meet performance standards, broaden their skills, shift to new specializations, and discern options for contributing to the larger institution and the profession. Through mentoring, mentors may be invigorated by contributing to the growth of mentees and by encountering ideas and approaches different from their own. Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal addresses the many dimensions of contemporary academic library mentoring and how best to engage in inclusive, effective mentoring.
 
[more]

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Academic Library Mentoring
Fostering Growth and Renewal: Volume 3: Mentoring of Students and Staff
Leila June Rod-Welch
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2021
Mentoring in academic libraries implies a belief in the future of library employees, systems, the profession, and the principles that libraries uphold. It signifies a commitment to the broader institution and to higher education’s values of exploration, discovery, critical examination, and knowledge generation.
 
Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal presents a cross-section of mentoring thought and practice in college and university libraries, including mentoring definitions, practice fundamentals, models, program development, surveys, and analysis. Across three volumes, it explores library mentoring programs and the lived experiences of library faculty, librarians, library staff members, graduate library and information science students, and library student employees.
 
Volume 1, Fundamentals and Controversies, details effective mentoring skills and behaviors, mentoring models, dysfunctional mentoring relationships, conflicts of interest in mentoring, and, through a feminist lens, power differentials in mentoring. Chapters on diversity, equity, and inclusion call for library personnel to understand the exclusion some experience in the profession and to implement more inclusive mentoring practices.
 
Mentoring of Library Faculty and Librarians, Volume 2, explores mentorship skills, models, purposes and issues, and program development. Mentoring purposes include support for the pursuit of tenure and promotion, other career goals, and psychosocial concerns. Issues incorporate understanding and addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion in mentoring. Chapter methodologies include surveys, program assessments, analysis of practices against standards, case studies of mentor and mentee lived experiences, and case studies of libraries and affiliated entities.
 
In Volume 3, Mentoring of Students and Staff, we hear the voices of library science students and library student employees as they describe their library school and library employment mentoring experiences. Also presented are mentoring programs for recruiting individuals to the profession, practices supporting all library employees regardless of formal employee classification, and methods for enhancing the skills of consortial members. The volume ends with a look to the future of mentoring and organizational development and with a tool any library employee at any career stage can use in forming their own mentoring constellation.
 
Intentional, effective, committed mentorships can help mentees understand their roles and develop their identities as librarians, library workers, or library science students. Mentorships also help mentees understand and meet performance standards, broaden their skills, shift to new specializations, and discern options for contributing to the larger institution and the profession. Through mentoring, mentors may be invigorated by contributing to the growth of mentees and by encountering ideas and approaches different from their own. Academic Library Mentoring: Fostering Growth and Renewal addresses the many dimensions of contemporary academic library mentoring and how best to engage in inclusive, effective mentoring.
 
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Academic Library Value
The Impact Starter Kit
Megan Oakleaf
American Library Association, 2017

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Achieving National Board Certification for School Library Media Specialists
A Study Guide
Gail Dickinson
American Library Association, 2005

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Acquisitions
Core Concepts and Practices
Jesse Holden
American Library Association, 2016

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Action Plan for Outcomes Assessment in Your Library
Peter Hernon
American Library Association, 2002

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Adult Programs in the Library
Brett W. Lear
American Library Association, 2013

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Adults Just Wanna Have Fun
Programs for Emerging Adults
Audrey Barbakoff
American Library Association, 2016

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Advocacy and Awareness for Archivists
Kathleen D. Roe
American Library Association, 2019

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Affordable Course Materials
Electronic Textbooks and Open Educational Resources
Chris Diaz
American Library Association, 2017

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After Disruption
A Future for Cultural Memory
Trevor Owens
University of Michigan Press, 2024
The digital age is burning out our most precious resources and the future of the past is at stake. In After Disruption: A Future for Cultural Memory, Trevor Owens warns that our institutions of cultural memory—libraries, archives, museums, humanities departments, research institutes, and more—have been “disrupted,” and largely not for the better. He calls for memory workers and memory institutions to take back control of envisioning the future of memory from management consultants and tech sector evangelists. 

After Disruption posits that we are no longer planning for a digital future, but instead living in a digital present. In this context, Owens asks how we plan for and develop a more just, sustainable, and healthy future for cultural memory. The first half of the book draws on critical scholarship on the history of technology and business to document and expose the sources of tech startup ideologies and their pernicious results, revealing that we need powerful and compelling counter frameworks and values to replace these ideologies. The second half of the book makes the case for the centrality of maintenance, care, and repair as interrelated frameworks to build a better future in which libraries, archives, and museums can thrive as sites of belonging and connection through collections.
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After-School Clubs for Kids
Thematic Programming to Encourage Reading
Lisa M. Shaia
American Library Association, 2014

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The ALA Book of Library Grant Money
Nancy Kalikow Maxwell
American Library Association, 2014

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The ALA Book of Library Grant Money
Ann Kepler
American Library Association, 2012

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ALA Filing Rules
Filing Committee
American Library Association, 1980

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ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science
Michael Levine-Clark
American Library Association, 2013

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ALA Guide to Economics and Business Reference
American Library Association
American Library Association, 2011

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ALA Guide To Medical & Health Science
American Library Association
American Library Association, 2011

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The ALA Guide to Researching Modern China
Yunshan Ye
American Library Association, 2014

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ALA Guide to Sociology and Psychology Reference
Denise Beaubien Bennett
American Library Association, 2011

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ALA-APA Salary Survey
Librarian--Public and Academic
American Library Association
American Library Association, 2010

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All Ages Welcome
Recruiting and Retaining Younger Generations for Library Boards, Friends Groups, and Foundations
Lina Bertinelli
American Library Association, 2020

According to 2016 Pew Research Center survey data, Millennials are more likely to have visited a public library in the past year than any other adult demographic. But despite being core library users, millennials and other younger generations are often underrepresented on library boards and library advocacy groups, including Friends groups and Foundations.  But you can change that, with the help of this planner’s hands-on worksheets, brainstorming activities, checklists, and expert advice. Using this toolkit from United for Libraries you will

  • understand generational differences and commonalities through statistics and analysis of Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials and Generation Z/post-Millennials;
  • learn how to navigate the challenges of fundraising with the “debt generations” by persuasively answering the question “what’s in it for me?”;
  • master the ABCs of recruitment and retention, tailoring them to fit your library;
  • craft several customized pitches, giving you confidence no matter the situation or audience;
  • discover how to cement buy-in from two key groups, current organization members and your new recruits, thereby ensuring acceptance and enthusiasm all around;
  • work towards defining and managing diversity for your advocacy group; and
  • use tried and true methods for successful onboarding of volunteers, including a Board Member Orientation Checklist and guidance on mentoring.

Using this resource, libraries of all kinds will be empowered to grow and strengthen their recruitment, retention, and training of Trustees, Friends, and Foundation members.

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ALSC's Popular Picks for Young Readers
Diane Foote
American Library Association, 2014

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America's War
Talking about the Civil War and Emancipation on Their 150th Anniversaries
American Library Association
American Library Association, 2012

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Analyzing the Next-Generation Catalog
Andrew American Library Association
American Library Association

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Animal Shenanigans
Rob Reid
American Library Association, 2015

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Anniversaries and Holidays
Bernard Trawicky
American Library Association, 2000

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Annotated Book Lists Teen Reader
The Best from the Experts at YALSA-BK
American Library Association
American Library Association, 2011

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Anonymity
Alison Macrina
American Library Association, 2019

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Answering Teens' Tough Questions
mk Eagle
American Library Association, 2012

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Answers to the Health Questions People Ask in Libraries
A Medical Library Association Guide
American Library Association
American Library Association, 2008

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Applying Library Values To Emerging Technology
Pub #72
Peter D. Fernandez
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2018

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Approaches to Liaison Librarianship
Robin Canuel
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2021

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Architects of Memory
Information and Rhetoric in a Networked Archival Age
Nathan R. Johnson
University of Alabama Press, 2020
Probes the development of information management after World War II and its consequences for public memory and human agency
 
We are now living in the richest age of public memory. From museums and memorials to the vast digital infrastructure of the internet, access to the past is only a click away. Even so, the methods and technologies created by scientists, espionage agencies, and information management coders and programmers have drastically delimited the ways that communities across the globe remember and forget our wealth of retrievable knowledge.
 
In Architects of Memory: Information and Rhetoric in a Networked Archival Age, Nathan R. Johnson charts turning points where concepts of memory became durable in new computational technologies and modern memory infrastructures took hold. He works through both familiar and esoteric memory technologies—from the card catalog to the book cart to Zatocoding and keyword indexing—as he delineates histories of librarianship and information science and provides a working vocabulary for understanding rhetoric’s role in contemporary memory practices.
 
This volume draws upon the twin concepts of memory infrastructure and mnemonic technê to illuminate the seemingly opaque wall of mundane algorithmic techniques that determine what is worth remembering and what should be forgotten. Each chapter highlights a conflict in the development of twentieth-century librarianship and its rapidly evolving competitor, the discipline of information science. As these two disciplines progressed, they contributed practical techniques and technologies for making sense of explosive scientific advancement in the wake of World War II. Taming postwar science became part and parcel of practices and information technologies that undergird uncountable modern communication systems, including search engines, algorithms, and databases for nearly every national clearinghouse of the twenty-first century.
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Archival and Special Collections Facilities
Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Architects, and Engineers
Michele F. Pacifico
American Library Association, 2010

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The Archival Turn in Feminism
Outrage in Order
Kate Eichhorn
Temple University Press, 2014
In the 1990s, a generation of women born during the rise of the second wave feminist movement plotted a revolution. These young activists funneled their outrage and energy into creating music, and zines using salvaged audio equipment and stolen time on copy machines. By 2000, the cultural artifacts of this movement had started to migrate from basements and storage units to community and university archives, establishing new sites of storytelling and political activism.
 
The Archival Turn in Feminism chronicles these important cultural artifacts and their collection, cataloging, preservation, and distribution. Cultural studies scholar Kate Eichhorn examines institutions such as the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture at Duke University, The Riot Grrrl Collection at New York University, and the Barnard Zine Library. She also profiles the archivists who have assembled these significant feminist collections.
 
Eichhorn shows why young feminist activists, cultural producers, and scholars embraced the archive, and how they used it to stage political alliances across eras and generations.

A volume in the American Literatures Initiative
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Archival Values
Essays in Honor of Mark A. Greene
Christine Weideman
American Library Association, 2019

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Archive, Photography and the Language of Administration
Jane Birkin
Amsterdam University Press, 2020
This alternative study of archive and photography brings many types of image assemblages into view, always in relation to the regulated systems operating within the institutional milieu. The archive catalogue is presented as a critical tool for mapping image time, and the language of image description is seen as having a life, a worth and an aesthetic value of its own. Functioning at the intersection of text and image, the book combines media culture, archival techniques, and contemporary discourse on art and conceptual writing.
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Archive Stories
Facts, Fictions, and the Writing of History
Antoinette Burton, ed.
Duke University Press, 2005
Despite the importance of archives to the profession of history, there is very little written about actual encounters with them—about the effect that the researcher’s race, gender, or class may have on her experience within them or about the impact that archival surveillance, architecture, or bureaucracy might have on the histories that are ultimately written. This provocative collection initiates a vital conversation about how archives around the world are constructed, policed, manipulated, and experienced. It challenges the claims to objectivity associated with the traditional archive by telling stories that illuminate its power to shape the narratives that are “found” there.

Archive Stories brings together ethnographies of the archival world, most of which are written by historians. Some contributors recount their own experiences. One offers a moving reflection on how the relative wealth and prestige of Western researchers can gain them entry to collections such as Uzbekistan’s newly formed Central State Archive, which severely limits the access of Uzbek researchers. Others explore the genealogies of specific archives, from one of the most influential archival institutions in the modern West, the Archives nationales in Paris, to the significant archives of the Bakunin family in Russia, which were saved largely through the efforts of one family member. Still others explore the impact of current events on the analysis of particular archives. A contributor tells of researching the 1976 Soweto riots in the politically charged atmosphere of the early 1990s, just as apartheid in South Africa was coming to an end. A number of the essays question what counts as an archive—and what counts as history—as they consider oral histories, cyberspace, fiction, and plans for streets and buildings that were never built, for histories that never materialized.

Contributors. Tony Ballantyne, Marilyn Booth, Antoinette Burton, Ann Curthoys, Peter Fritzsche, Durba Ghosh, Laura Mayhall, Jennifer S. Milligan, Kathryn J. Oberdeck, Adele Perry, Helena Pohlandt-McCormick, John Randolph, Craig Robertson, Horacio N. Roque Ramírez, Jeff Sahadeo, Reneé Sentilles

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Archives
Andrew Lison
University of Minnesota Press, 2019

How digital networks and services bring the issues of archives out of the realm of institutions and into the lives of everyday users


Archives have become a nexus in the wake of the digital turn. Electronic files, search engines, video sites, and media player libraries make the concepts of “archival” and “retrieval” practically synonymous with the experience of interconnected computing. Archives today are the center of much attention but few agendas. Can archives inform the redistribution of power and resources when the concept of the public library as an institution makes knowledge and culture accessible to all members of society regardless of social or economic status? This book sets out to show that archives need our active support and continuing engagement. 

This volume offers three distinct perspectives on the present status of archives that are at once in disagreement and solidarity with each other, from contributors whose backgrounds cut across the theory–practice divide. Is the increasing digital storage of knowledge pushing us toward a turning point in its democratization? Can archives fulfill their paradoxical potential as utopian sites in which the analog and the digital, the past and future, and remembrance and forgetting commingle? Is there a downside to the present-day impulse toward total preservation? 

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Archives & Archivists in the Information Age
Richard J. Cox
American Library Association, 2005

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Archives Alive
Expanding Engagement with Public Library Archives and Special Collections
Diantha Dow Schull
American Library Association, 2015

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Archives in Libraries
What Librarians and Archivists Need to Know to Work Together
Megan Sniffin-Marinoff
American Library Association, 2017

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Archives Power
Randall C. Jimerson
American Library Association, 2009

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Arranging and Describing Archives and Manuscripts
Dennis Meissner
American Library Association, 2019

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Art Documentation
Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, volume 40 number 2 (Fall 2021)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2021
This is volume 40 issue 2 of Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a peer-reviewed journal presenting issues of concern to librarians working within art history, art criticism, the history of architecture, archaeology, and similar areas. The journal has established itself as a vital publication for art information professionals, acting as a forum for issues relating to both the documentation of art and the practice and theory of art librarianship and visual resources curatorship. Art Documentation will publish articles pertinent to issues surrounding the documentation of art and the use of visual resources in academic and special libraries and museum settings. It is a key resource for professionals entering the field as well as those more seasoned professionals.
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Art Documentation
Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, volume 41 number 1 (Spring 2022)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022
This is volume 41 issue 1 of Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a peer-reviewed journal presenting issues of concern to librarians working within art history, art criticism, the history of architecture, archaeology, and similar areas. The journal has established itself as a vital publication for art information professionals, acting as a forum for issues relating to both the documentation of art and the practice and theory of art librarianship and visual resources curatorship. Art Documentation will publish articles pertinent to issues surrounding the documentation of art and the use of visual resources in academic and special libraries and museum settings. It is a key resource for professionals entering the field as well as those more seasoned professionals.
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Art Documentation
Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America, volume 41 number 2 (Fall 2022)
The University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press Journals, 2022
This is volume 41 issue 2 of Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America. Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a peer-reviewed journal presenting issues of concern to librarians working within art history, art criticism, the history of architecture, archaeology, and similar areas. The journal has established itself as a vital publication for art information professionals, acting as a forum for issues relating to both the documentation of art and the practice and theory of art librarianship and visual resources curatorship. Art Documentation will publish articles pertinent to issues surrounding the documentation of art and the use of visual resources in academic and special libraries and museum settings. It is a key resource for professionals entering the field as well as those more seasoned professionals.
[more]

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The Art, Science, and Magic of the Data Curation Network
A Retrospective on Cross-Institutional Collaboration
Jake Carlson
Michigan Publishing Services, 2023
The Data Curation Network (DCN) is a membership organization of institutional and non-profit data repositories whose vision is to advance open research by making data more ethical, reusable, and understandable. Although initially conceived of and established through grant funding, the DCN transitioned to a sustainable, member-funded organization in July 2021, and is now composed of almost 50 data curators from 17 institutions.

The Art, Science, and Magic of the Data Curation Network: A Retrospective on Cross Institutional Collaboration captures the results of a project retrospective meeting and describes the necessary components of the DCN’s sustained collaboration in the hopes that the insights will be of use to other collaborative efforts. In particular, the authors describe the successes of the community and challenges of launching a cross-institutional network. Additionally, this publication details the administrative, tool-based, and trust-based structures necessary for establishing this community, the “radical collaboration” that is the cornerstone of the DCN, and potential future collaborations to address shared challenges in libraries and research data management. This in-depth case study provides an overview of the critical work of launching a collaborative network and transitioning to sustainability. This publication will be of special interest to research librarians, data curators, and anyone interested in academic community building.
 
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Artsy Toddler Storytimes
A Year's Worth of Ready-To-Go Programming
Carol Garnett Hopkins
American Library Association, 2013

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Ask, Listen, Empower
Grounding Your Library Work in Community Engagement
Sarah Ostman and Mary Davis Fournier
American Library Association, 2020

Foreword by Tracie D. Hall

Community engagement isn’t simply an important component of a successful library—it’s the foundation upon which every service, offering, and initiative rests. Working collaboratively with community members—be they library customers, residents, faculty, students or partner organizations— ensures that the library works, period. This important resource from ALA’s Public Programs Office (PPO) provides targeted guidance on how libraries can effectively engage with the public to address a range of issues for the betterment of their community, whether it is a city, neighborhood, campus, or something else. Featuring contributions by leaders active in library-led community engagement, it’s designed to be equally useful as a teaching text for LIS students and a go-to handbook for current programming, adult services, and outreach library staff. Balancing practical tools with case studies and stories from field, this collection explores such key topics as

  • why libraries belong in the community engagement realm;
  • getting the support of board and staff;
  • how to understand your community;
  • the ethics and challenges of engaging often unreached segments of the community;
  • identifying and building engaged partnerships;
  • collections and community engagement;
  • engaged programming; and
  • outcome measurement.
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Assessing Liaison Librarians
Documenting Impact For
Daniel Mack
American Library Association, 2014

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Assessing Liaison Librarians
Documenting Impact for Positive Change
Daniel C. Mack
Assoc of College & Research Libraries, 2014

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Assessing Service Quality
Satisfying the Expectations of Library Customers
Peter Hernon
American Library Association, 2015

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Assessing Service Quality
Satisfying the Expectations of Library Customers
American Library Association
American Library Association, 1998

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Assessment Strategies in Technical Services
Kimberley A. Edwards
American Library Association, 2019

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Assistive Technologies in the Library
Barbara T. Mates
American Library Association, 2011

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Audiobooks for Youth
A Practical Guide to Sound Literature
Mary Burkey
American Library Association, 2012


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